Blogs

Microbiology Book for Kids: It's Catching by Jennifer Gardy and Josh Holinaty

Feed: The Tree of Life

A few days ago I wrote about how I wanted to share some information about what I have found to be good childrens' science books (based on reading books to my kids).  Well, here is another one: It's Catching: The Infectious World of Germs and Microbes by Jennifer Gardy and Josh Holinaty.

Microbe-themed art of the month: Seung-Hwan Oh portraits w/ mold

Feed: The Tree of Life

OK this is pretty cool (from a microbe-art-science point of view): An Artist Who Paints Portraits With Mold | WIRED.  Seung-Hwan Oh "had to set up a micro-fungus farm in his studio" and he puts film in a warm wet environment (note to self - there could be a new human microbiome aspect of this project depending on what warm wet environment is chosen) and sometimes seeds the system with some mold.  And then he lets nature do its work.See more about his Impermanence works here.

On identifiers (again)

Feed: iPhylo

I'm going to the TDWG Identifier Workshop this weekend, so I thought I'd jot down a few notes. The biodiversity informatics community has been at this for a while, and we still haven't got identifiers sorted out.From my perspective as both a data aggregator (e.g., BioNames) and a data provider (e.g., BioStor) there are four things I think we need to tackle in order to make significant progress.Discoverability (strings to things)A basic challenge is to go from strings, such as bibliographic citations, specimen codes, taxonomic names, etc., to digital identifiers for those things.

On identifiers (again)

Feed: iPhylo

I'm going to the TDWG Identifier Workshop this weekend, so I thought I'd jot down a few notes. The biodiversity informatics community has been at this for a while, and we still haven't got identifiers sorted out.From my perspective as both a data aggregator (e.g., BioNames) and a data provider (e.g., BioStor) there are four things I think we need to tackle in order to make significant progress.Discoverability (strings to things)A basic challenge is to go from strings, such as bibliographic citations, specimen codes, taxonomic names, etc., to digital identifiers for those things.

Kids' Microbiology Book Review: Germ Stories

Feed: The Tree of Life

I was going through some kids' books today and found quite a few that I thought were wonderful and thought - well - I should post about some of them.

Harvard, hope and hype: the sad reason behind overselling diabetes stem cell work - raising money

Feed: The Tree of Life

Earlier in the week I got all fired up - not in a good way - about a press release and news stories relating to a new paper from Doug Melton on a insulin producing STEM cell studyExceptionally disappointed in Doug Melton of @HHMI for publishing new important diabetes paper as #closedaccess pic.twitter.com/DefoWwmiBR— Jonathan Eisen (@phylogenomics) October 10, 2014 With a little more discussion I just got more angry .@HHMINEWS and publishes the groundbreaking paper behind a paywall so online the elite can see it #closedaccess pic.twitter.com/ZPriyCdHvY— Jonathan Eisen (@phylogenomics) October

Putting invasions into context

Feed: The EEB and flow

How can we better predict invasions?Ernesto Azzurro, Victor M. Tuset,Antoni Lombarte, Francesc Maynou, Daniel Simberloff,  Ana Rodríguez-Pérez and Ricard V. Solé. External morphology explains the success of biological invasions. Ecology Letters (2014) 17: 1455–1463.Fridley, J. D. and Sax, D. F. (2014), The imbalance of nature: revisiting a Darwinian framework for invasion biology. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 23: 1157–1166.

Talk for UC Davis Pre-Health Meeting (#UCDPHSA): Opening up to Diversity

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Sunday I gave a talk at the "12th National UC Davis Pre-Health Student Alliance Pre-Medical and Pre-Health Professions Conference".  I normally try to not give talks on weekends (to spend time with my family) but I made an exception here since this meeting has a strong commitment to issues relating to diversity in health and STEM fields.

What is ecology’s billion dollar brain?

Feed: The EEB and flow

(*The topic of the billion dollar proposal came up with Florian Hartig (@florianhartig), with whom I had an interesting conversation on the idea*)Last year, the European Commission awarded 1 billion dollars to a hugely ambitious project to recreate the human brain using supercomputers. If successful, the Human Brain Project would revolutionize neuroscience.

All Nobel Prizes in 2014 Will be Microbially Themed: The Microbes Guarantee It

Feed: The Tree of Life

So - last year I secretly created a microbiome based spying system that can transmit the thoughts and emails of people who they colonize.  I introduced this community into all the people on the various Nobel Prize committees in order to get information in advance about their plans for the Nobel Prizes. After getting such information, and discovering that the Nobel's this year were NOT focused on microbes, I then created a microbiome-behavioral manipulation system and re-infected the Nobel committees with this community.  This community forces their host to think about microbes all the time.

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