Blogs

Yet another mostly male meeting (YAMMM) from Cold Spring Harbor

Feed: The Tree of Life

I guess this would go down in "You Can't Make This Stuff Up" or something like that. A few weeks ago, I posted an anonymous guest post about the lack of female speakers at the Programming for Biology workshop at Cold Spring Harbor Labs: Guest post on Yet Another Mostly Male Meeting (YAMMM) - Programming for Biology.  This got a response from Cold Spring Harbor on Twitter claiming they do work to have diverse speakers at their meetings. Then I got an email last week inviting me to Cold Spring Harbor meeting on the History of DNA Sequencing with a truly awful gender ratio.

Kudos to California Academy of Sciences for Responding (Well) to Gender Bias Issue at Meeting They Are Hosting

Feed: The Tree of Life

Just a quick post of a Storify relating to a meeting at the Calacademy: [View the story "California Academy of Sciences responds (well) to gender bias of meeting they are hosting" on Storify]
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This is from the "Tree of Life Blog"
of Jonathan Eisen, an evolutionary biologist and Open Access advocate
at the University of California, Davis. For short updates, follow me on Twitter.

Cold Spring Harbor presents the men's only view on the evolution of sequencing

Feed: The Tree of Life

On June 5 I posted a guest blog post by an anonymous person writing about the Programming for Biology workshop at Cold Spring Harbor Labs: Guest post on Yet Another Mostly Male Meeting (YAMMM) - Programming for Biology And this post generated some responses including yesterday a series of responses from whomever is behind the Cold Spring Harbor Meetings Twitter account.@phylogenomics @mike_schatz We do have a role. Course instructors develop speaker lists but we work with them, especially on diversity.

Biodiversity Data Journal data lost on the way to GBIF and EOL

Feed: iPhylo

Two ongoing challenges in biodiversity informatics are getting data into a form that is usable, and linking that data across different projects platforms. A recent and interesting approach to this problem are "data journals" as exemplified by the Biodiversity Data Journal. I've been exploring some data from this journal that has been aggregated by GBIf and EOL, and have come across a few issues. In this post I'll firstly outline the standard format for moving data between biodiversity projects, the Darwin Core Archive, then illustrate some of the pitfalls.

The devil isn't always in the details: how system properties can inform ecology

Feed: The EEB and flow

Selection on stability across ecological scales. Jonathan J. Borrelli, Stefano Allesina, Priyanga Amarasekare, Roger Arditi, Ivan Chase, John Damuth, Robert D. Holt, Dmitrii O. Logofet, Mark Novak, Rudolf P. Rohr, Axel G. Rossberg, Matthew Spencer, J. Khai Tran, Lev R. Ginzburg. 2015. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2015.05.001.This paper in TREE  on selection at higher level systems has been on my must-read list since it came out a few weeks ago, and it was worth the wait.

Thoughts on ReCon 15: DOIs, GitHub, ORCID, altmetric, and transitive credit

Feed: iPhylo

Man03gTw 400x400I spent last Friday and Saturday at (Research in the 21st Century: Data, Analytics and Impact, hashtag #ReCon_15) in Edinburgh. Friday 19th was conference day, followed by a hackday at CodeBase. There's a Storify archive of the tweets so you can get a sense of the meeting. Sitting in the audience a few things struck me.

Visualising Geophylogenies in Web Maps Using GeoJSON

Feed: iPhylo

Fig3 GoogleMaps CC BY no logo 300x205I've published a short note on my work on geophylogenies and GeoJSON in PLoS Currents Tree of Life: Page R. Visualising Geophylogenies in Web Maps Using GeoJSON. PLOS Currents Tree of Life. 2015 Jun 23 . Edition 1.

Hoss Cartwright from Bonanza rocks the science world by joining many editorial boards

Feed: The Tree of Life

A few years ago I wrote about a brilliant and scary real world satire done by Burkhard Morgenstern:Scary and funny: fake researcher Peter Uhnemann on OMICS group Editorial Board #JournalSPAM | The Tree of LifeWell he has done it again.

From the Archives: Conservation now and then

Feed: The EEB and flow

For the rest of the summer (until ESA!), we’re going to highlight some of the older topics and posts from the EEB & Flow.

The problem with collaboration in the electronic era...

Feed: The EEB and flow

E-communication has revolutionized every aspect of our lives. From how we shop, find love, watch movies and do science, the ability to interact with others globally has virtually eliminated barriers to the flow of ideas. I have fruitful collaborations with researchers in many different countries, which are greatly enhanced by e-mail and Skype.

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